30 September, 2014
82. Shopping
Written and Directed by: Paul W. S. Anderson
Produced by: Jeremy Bolt, among others
Cinematography by: Tony Imi
Edited by: David Stiven
Original Score by: Barrington Pheloung
Starring: Sadie Frost, Jude Law, Sean Pertwee, Fraser James, Sean Bean, Marianne Faithfull, Jonathan Pryce, Daniel Newman, Lee Whitlock, Ralph Ineson, Eamonn Walker, Jason Isaacs
Synopsis: Recently released from jail, rebellious teen Billy (Jude Law) and his girlfriend Jo (Sadie Frost) find entertainment in British suburbia through joyriding and ram-raiding local businesses, much to the annoyance of police chief Conway (Jonathan Pryce) and rival gang-leader/ram-raider Tommy (Sean Pertwee).
Thoughts:
The synopsis on Netflix sounded peculiar enough to be interesting, and never having seen any of Paul W. S. Anderson’s work before (though hearing a lot of not-so-positive things about it) I decided to give him the benefit of the doubt and check out his debut film. I was hoping for an action-packed or at least stylistic genre piece, but in reality it was DOWNRIGHT. FUCKING. BORING..
The film is less than two hours long but it feels even longer. There are too many scenes that go on way too long, with hollow conflicts, dull dialogue, as well as what I’m pretty certain was shameless product placement. What makes these scenes drag on even longer is the cast of flat and uninteresting characters. The actors try to make the most of it through the occasional crazy outbursts in an attempt to show depth but it comes off as ridiculous and pathetically melodramatic. There’s very little action and it’s not even choreographed/shot well. And it should be noted that a film that wastes Jonathan Pryce by only giving him a small handful of lines, as well as only giving Sean Bean one measly scene (in which he isn’t even killed off!), is a cinematic crime—a misdemeanor, at the very least.
From now on I’m sticking with Paul THOMAS Anderson, or possibly even WES Anderson, as this was the first and probably last Paul W. S. Anderson film I’ll ever see.

82. Shopping

Written and Directed by: Paul W. S. Anderson

Produced by: Jeremy Bolt, among others

Cinematography by: Tony Imi

Edited by: David Stiven

Original Score by: Barrington Pheloung

Starring: Sadie Frost, Jude Law, Sean Pertwee, Fraser James, Sean Bean, Marianne Faithfull, Jonathan Pryce, Daniel Newman, Lee Whitlock, Ralph Ineson, Eamonn Walker, Jason Isaacs

Synopsis: Recently released from jail, rebellious teen Billy (Jude Law) and his girlfriend Jo (Sadie Frost) find entertainment in British suburbia through joyriding and ram-raiding local businesses, much to the annoyance of police chief Conway (Jonathan Pryce) and rival gang-leader/ram-raider Tommy (Sean Pertwee).

Thoughts:

The synopsis on Netflix sounded peculiar enough to be interesting, and never having seen any of Paul W. S. Anderson’s work before (though hearing a lot of not-so-positive things about it) I decided to give him the benefit of the doubt and check out his debut film. I was hoping for an action-packed or at least stylistic genre piece, but in reality it was DOWNRIGHT. FUCKING. BORING..

The film is less than two hours long but it feels even longer. There are too many scenes that go on way too long, with hollow conflicts, dull dialogue, as well as what I’m pretty certain was shameless product placement. What makes these scenes drag on even longer is the cast of flat and uninteresting characters. The actors try to make the most of it through the occasional crazy outbursts in an attempt to show depth but it comes off as ridiculous and pathetically melodramatic. There’s very little action and it’s not even choreographed/shot well. And it should be noted that a film that wastes Jonathan Pryce by only giving him a small handful of lines, as well as only giving Sean Bean one measly scene (in which he isn’t even killed off!), is a cinematic crime—a misdemeanor, at the very least.

From now on I’m sticking with Paul THOMAS Anderson, or possibly even WES Anderson, as this was the first and probably last Paul W. S. Anderson film I’ll ever see.

30 September, 2014
81. The Holy Mountain
Written and Directed by: Alejandro Jodorowsky
Produced by: Robert Taicher (executive producer), among others
Cinematography by: Rafael Corkidi
Edited by: Federico Landeros
Original Score by: Don Cherry, Ronald Frangipane, Alejandro Jodorowsky
Starring: Alejandro Jodorowsky, Horacio Salinas, Zamira Saunders, Juan Ferrara, Adriana Page, Burt Kleiner, Valerie Jodorowsky, Nicky Nichols, Richard Rutowski, Luis Lomelí, Ana De Sade
Synopsis: A petty thief (Horacio Salinas) goes through multiple trials and tribulations in order to find happiness before crossing paths with the Alchemist (Alejandro Jodorowsky). This wizened old man anoints the thief as one of the nine most powerful members of humanity, whose collective goal is to become all-powerful and achieve nirvana.
Thoughts:
What an absolute trip of a film!
No, for real—that’s what this film felt like. Whatever semblance of a plot it had seemed to follow stoner logic to a T, trickling from one event to another in a stream-of-consciousness sort of way. In fact, had I been stoned while watching it (I was sober, unfortunately) I may have been able to “get it” more thoroughly than I did.
But it’s still an absolutely beautiful—albeit fucking crazy—film experience that revels in the metaphysical with euphoric outcomes. Sure, I may still be confused about the film overall, but it was worth it for the insane journey that Jodorowsky gave me. I’m glad this was my introduction to his filmography, as it’s not just a look into his own aesthetic but it’s also an example of the weird limits the medium of film can be pushed.
If you like surrealism/absurdism/existentialism/downright insanity, please give this a watch. As for me, I need to find the rest of Jodorowsky’s work and watch the hell out of it!

81. The Holy Mountain

Written and Directed by: Alejandro Jodorowsky

Produced by: Robert Taicher (executive producer), among others

Cinematography by: Rafael Corkidi

Edited by: Federico Landeros

Original Score by: Don Cherry, Ronald Frangipane, Alejandro Jodorowsky

Starring: Alejandro Jodorowsky, Horacio Salinas, Zamira Saunders, Juan Ferrara, Adriana Page, Burt Kleiner, Valerie Jodorowsky, Nicky Nichols, Richard Rutowski, Luis Lomelí, Ana De Sade

Synopsis: A petty thief (Horacio Salinas) goes through multiple trials and tribulations in order to find happiness before crossing paths with the Alchemist (Alejandro Jodorowsky). This wizened old man anoints the thief as one of the nine most powerful members of humanity, whose collective goal is to become all-powerful and achieve nirvana.

Thoughts:

What an absolute trip of a film!

No, for real—that’s what this film felt like. Whatever semblance of a plot it had seemed to follow stoner logic to a T, trickling from one event to another in a stream-of-consciousness sort of way. In fact, had I been stoned while watching it (I was sober, unfortunately) I may have been able to “get it” more thoroughly than I did.

But it’s still an absolutely beautiful—albeit fucking crazy—film experience that revels in the metaphysical with euphoric outcomes. Sure, I may still be confused about the film overall, but it was worth it for the insane journey that Jodorowsky gave me. I’m glad this was my introduction to his filmography, as it’s not just a look into his own aesthetic but it’s also an example of the weird limits the medium of film can be pushed.

If you like surrealism/absurdism/existentialism/downright insanity, please give this a watch. As for me, I need to find the rest of Jodorowsky’s work and watch the hell out of it!

30 September, 2014
"Why do people go to the cinema? What takes them into a darkened room where, for two hours, they watch the play of shadows on a sheet? The search for entertainment? The need for a kind of drug? All over the world there are, indeed, entertainment firms and organisations which exploit cinema and television and spectacles of many other kinds. Our starting-point, however, should not be there, but in the essential principles of cinema, which have to do with the human need to master and know the world. I think that what a person normally goes to the cinema for is time: for time lost or spent or not yet had. He goes there for living experience; for cinema, like no other art, widens, enhances and concentrates a person’s experience—and not only enhances it but makes it longer, significantly longer. That is the power of cinema: ‘stars’, story-lines and entertainment have nothing to do with it."

Andrei TarkovskySculpting In Time (1987)

(Source: endofalldoubt, via cinematicfantastic)

29 September, 2014
Cinematography : 8 Women Who Are Killing It

bicephalypictures:

Out of the 250 top-grossing films of 2013, only 3% were shot by women. Only 3%! That’s 7.5 women out of 250 cinematographers.

Three is a measly percent, but the women who are that percent are ones to watch out for. The following are eight talented cinematographers you’ve probably never heard of, but remember these ladies and keep an eye out for their work.

Ellen Kuras

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (dir. Michel Gondry)

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Maryse Alberti

The Wrestler (dir. Darren Aronofsky)

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Reed Morano

Kill Your Darlings (dir.John Krokidas)

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Rachel Morrison

Sound of My Voice (dir. Zal Batmanglij)

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Mandy Walker

Australia (dir. Baz Luhrmann)

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Rain Li

Paranoid Park (dir. Gus Van Sant)

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Agnès Godard

Sister (dir. Ursula Meier)

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Caroline Champetier

Holy Motors (dir. Leos Carax)

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Hey bendovercasanova, we were talking about female cinematographers the other day, weren’t we?

Anyway, go watch these films and support not only female filmmakers but quality cinema in general. If you haven’t heard me rave about it already, Holy Motors is one of the best films I’ve seen this year and you should all go check it out on Netflix right now. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind is equally fantastic. Australia’s an enjoyable epic; Paranoid Park is, if anything, very pretty to look at; and although I’m conflicted about Sound of My Voice overall it’s at least worth a watch for Brit Marling’s slightly creepy yet very anchored performance.

Haven’t seen the other three, but I’ll be sure to put them on my watchlist.

(via salesonfilm)

26 September, 2014
Let the madness begin. @mkefilm #MFF2014

Let the madness begin. @mkefilm #MFF2014